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  • This WPA2 KRACK attack means your WiFi is not secure – even though everyone thought it was

    Credit card numbers, passwords, emails and photos could be seen by any attacker.

    A bombshell new report says it doesn't matter how good your password is, or what other security settings you have – if you're using WiFi, it's possible for someone to spy on every single thing you do.

    And it affects essentially every WiFi network being used, from your private home set-up to the one at your local coffee shop.

    The discovery of this serious new issue comes from Mathy Vanhoef, a Belgian computer security researcher. Vanhoef published the findings Monday on a dedicated website, KRACKattacks.com.

    The flaw lets people "read information that was previously assumed to be safely encrypted," Vanhoef wrote. "This can be abused to steal sensitive information such as credit card numbers, passwords, chat messages, emails, photos, and so on." 

    And the scope is potentially huge: "The attack works against all modern protected Wi-Fi networks," he said.

    How it works

    We're going to keep this part brief, because it gets very technical very quick.

    It concerns the use of "WPA2," a proven method of protecting data on a network. (You've probably seen it when setting up WiFi at a new house or apartment.) WPA2 has been used to make WiFi connections secure for a decade now – it's the "modern standard," Consumerist explains, because it was thought to be well-protected.

    The flaw Vanhoef discovered is in the core function of WPA2, during what's referred to as a "4-way handshake." The WiFi access point and the device that's connecting to it talk to each other to make sure credentials match. The device gets issued a new, fresh encryption key, which secures any data that gets sent over that connection (so web browsing, streaming, etc.).

     

    But there's a way for an attacker to have the WiFi access point and your device redo part of that "handshake" process. It forces the device to take an already-used encryption key – not a fresh new one. That gives the attacker an opening to spy on any data that goes over the connection.

    Here's a short demo video from Vanhoef (but heads-up, it's pretty technical):

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  • The King Is Back: Nokia Reveals Their First Android Phone: The Nokia 6 | Technology

    If you’ve been waiting for the king to make a comeback, it’s your lucky day – HMD Global, the company that own the global licensing rights for Nokia’s brand name has officially announced the Nokia 6, their first ever Android-powered smartphone.

    Nokia 6 specs

    • Qualcomm Snapdragon 430 octa-core processor
    • Adreno 505 GPU
    • 5.5-inch full HD display, 2.5D glass, 1920 x 1080 resolution
    • 4GB RAM
    • 64GB internal storage expandable storage up to 128GB via microSD
    • 16-megapixel rear camera, f/2.0 aperture, PDAF, Laser AF, flash
    • 8-megapixel front camera, f/2.0 aperture
    • Dual SIM
    • 3G, LTE
    • WiFi, Bluetooth, GPS, A-GPS, Fingerprint scanner
    • 3000mAh battery with fast charging
    • Android 7.0 Nougat

    Curiously the phone is of the mid-range variety, packing a Snapdragon 430 chipset along with a 5.5-inch, full HD, 2.5D display. There’s 4GB of RAM on board, along with 64GB of storage. The 3000mAh battery is quickly replenished by QuickCharge 3.0. The rear camera is a 16-megapixel unit with f/2.0 aperture, PDAF and laser AF while the front camera is a 8-megapixel unit with an f/2.0 aperture.

     

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  • How to tell if your Facebook has been hacked (and what to do) - Social Network [ VIDEO ] | Technology

    Here's a simple way to see if there is someone messing with your Facebook account.

    There are several different ways hackers use a breached Facebook account. Automatic logins through Facebook allow hackers access to many different site accounts once they've taken over your Facebook. Spammers also hack Facebook accounts to gain access to your following. From your profile, a hacker can additionally gather a lot of personal information about you that can be used to steal your identity.

    How to check if you've been hacked

    If you worry that your account has been hacked, there is a simple way to check. Go to the arrow in the upper right-hand corner of your Facebook page and click on it. In the menu, select Settings. A new menu will pop up. Choose Security and then Where You're Logged In.

    A list of all of the devices that you've logged into and their locations will pop up. If there is a login you don't recognize, chances are you may have been hacked. If you see anything that isn't you, click End Activity on the right side of the log to end the session. The hacker will be logged out, temporarily.

     

     

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  • How to post 360-degree photos to Facebook | Technology

    Sharing regular photos with your Facebook friends is a thing of the past -- the future revolves around interactive pics.

    By now, you've undoubtedly come across an interactive photo whilst browsing your Facebook feed. Such photos instruct you to hold your phone up and move it around to view different parts of the photo.

    It's a fun way of viewing so-called 360-degree photos. And would make one believe you need fancy, or expensive equipment to make it happen. The truth is, however, you don't need a special camera or even a 360-degree photo app in order to upload your own interactive picture.

    SOURCE:

    CNET- https://www.cnet.com/how-to/how-to-live-stream-360-video-on-facebook/

     

     

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  • Shares in UK chip designer Imagination Technologies have plunged more than 60% after Apple said it would end a deal to use its products | Technology

    The US company uses the UK firm's chip technology in its iPhones, iPads, and iPods under a licensing agreement.

    Apple's royalty payments account for about half Imagination's revenues.

    Shares fell 165p to 103p, valuing the company at about £250m - down from about £765m before the announcement was made on Monday morning.

    Imagination said Apple, its largest customer, would stop using its products in "15 months to two years".

    Apple is developing its own technology, but Imagination said this would be difficult without infringing patents.

    Apple has told Imagination that it is "working on a separate, independent graphics design in order to control its products and will be reducing its future reliance on Imagination's technology".

    Imagination, like the UK's ARM Holdings, is at the forefront of computer chip technology globally. ARM was sold last year to Japan's Softbank, a deal criticised as selling out of the UK's winners.

    The Financial Times reported last year that Apple, which owns 8% of the UK company, had held talks about buying Imagination.

    SOURCE:

    BBC :- http://www.bbc.com/news/business-39476898

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